Impact of the Hydraulic Fracturing Ban on Allegheny County Parks

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COUNTY PARKS, LIKE THIS. ALLEGHENY COUNCILOR OVERALL SAYS THE BILL HAS NO IMPACT IN THEIR PLANNED FUTURE FRACKING PLANS. COUNCIL MEMBER OLIVIA BENNETT SAYS SHE IS EXCITED FOR THE DECISION SHE IS PUSHING. >> HOW WILL THIS AFFECT COUNTY PARKS? >> BY SECURING THEM. >> SHE SAYS THE BILL PROHIBITS FUTURE DIVIDE AND HEAVY INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITIES THAT PART AND THAT THE EXPENSIVE LAKES PARK PROJECT CAN CONTINUE BUT WORK CANNOT BE EXPANDED. THE PRESIDENT OF THE MARCELLUS SHALE COALITION IS DISAPPOINTED WITH THIS MOVEMENT. >> WE BELIEVE WE CAN HAVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND ADVANCEMENT THROUGH THE SAFE AND RESPONSIBLE DEVELOPMENT OF NATURAL GAS AND WE ARE MARKED — SEE IT HAPPEN AND YOUR LAKES. >>THEY VOTED TO KEEP THE TOXIC DIVIDE OUT OF THE PARKS. THIS WILL HELP ENSURE THAT THESE OUTDOOR SPACES ARE SAFE FOR KAYAK, BIKE, HIKING AND OTHER PLEASURES FOR GENERATIONS TO COME. >> IT MAKES A POINT TO SEND THE INVOICE IS NOT INTENDED TO RESTRICT ALL COMMERCIAL BUSINESS SUCH AS WRIST-CONNECTED LEISURE. DIMARCO SAYS HE IS CONCERNED THAT THE LANGUAGE OF THE BILL IS TOO VARIETY. >> WE BELIEVE THAT WAS TOO BROAD. THEY DON’T SPECIFY WHEN THEY SAY BUSINESS REASONS, YOU KNOW? AND IT CAN’T BE, IT CAN BE ANYTHING OTHER THAN FRACKING, OK? LIKE KAYAK RENTALS, RESTAURANT IN NORTH ARC, SKI OPERATORS OUT OF BOYCE PARK. >> WE’RE NOT SAYING TO RESTRICT ALL BUSINESS. IF THE BUSINESS IS RELATED TO LEISURE, WE WILL BE ASSURED THAT THE BUSINESS CAN STILL STAY THERE. CHANDI: FITZGERALD WAS NOT AVAILABLE TO COMMENT ON THE REPLACEMENT HE IS REFERRING

Impact of the Hydraulic Fracturing Ban on Allegheny County Parks

Allegheny County, At-Large Councilman Sam DeMarco said a bill banning fracking in county parks has no impact because no fracking projects are planned, but the Council member Olivia Bennett said she was delighted with the decision she pushed for. Ban on fracking in County Parks: watch the report above. “It will impact county parks by making them safe,” Bennett said Wednesday. continue, but the job cannot be extended. Marcellus Shale Coalition President David Callahan said he was disappointed with the decision. and we see that happening at Deer Lakes Park,” Callahan said. Zachary Barber, along with groups like Penn Environment, called the bill a victory. o keeping toxic fracking out of our parks, like North Park or Harrison Hills, which will help ensure these outdoor spaces are safe for kayaking, biking, hiking and other recreation for generations to come,” said Barber said. say that the bill is not intended to restrict all commercial enterprises, such as those related to recreation. She gives the example of renting kayaks. DeMarco said he was concerned that the wording of the bill was too vague. “They don’t specify when they talk about commercial leases that it can only be fracking. So the concern is the kayak rentals, the restaurant in North Park, the ski operators in Boyce Park.” Bennett said: ‘We’re not saying we’re restricting all business. Leisure-related businesses, of course, we’ll make sure that business can stay there.’ County Executive Rich Fitzgerald was unavailable. to comment on the board’s vote override its veto. His office referred Pittsburgh’s Action News 4 to its statement last week about why it chose to veto it.

At-Large Allegheny County Councilman Sam DeMarco said a bill banning fracking in county parks has no impact because no fracking projects are planned, but the Council member Olivia Bennett said she was pleased with the decision she was advocating.

Hydraulic fracturing ban in county parks: Watch the report above.

“It will impact county parks by making them safe,” Bennett said Wednesday.

She said the bill prohibits future fracking and heavy industrial activities in the parks.

Bennett said the project involving hydraulic fracturing at Deer Lakes Park can continue, but the work cannot be expanded.

Marcellus Shale Coalition President David Callahan said he was disappointed with the decision.

“We believe we can have both economic development and environmental protection, if not environmental advancement, through the safe and responsible development of natural gas, and we see that happening in Deer Park. Lakes,” Callahan said.

Zachary Barber, along with groups like Penn Environment, called the bill a victory.

“They voted to prevent toxic fracking of our parks, like North Park or Harrison Hills, which will help ensure these outdoor spaces are safe for kayaking, biking, hiking and other recreation for generations to come. “, said Barber.

Bennett is keen to say that the bill is not intended to restrict all commercial enterprises, such as those related to recreation. She gives the example of renting kayaks.

DeMarco said he was concerned that the wording of the bill was too vague.

“We think it was too broad,” he said. “They don’t specify when they say commercial leases that it can only be fracking. So the concern is the kayak rentals, the restaurant in North Park, the ski operators in Boyce Park .”

Bennett said: “We’re not saying we’re restricting all activities. Leisure-related businesses, of course, we’ll make sure those activities can stay there.”

County Executive Rich Fitzgerald was unavailable to comment on the council’s vote to override his veto. His office referred Pittsburgh’s Action News 4 to its statement last week about why it chose to veto it.

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